Grief Support Group Scheduled

by Frank Thu, September 30 2010 23:59

As part of our continued effort to help support you and your family, we are pleased to sponsor a grief support group scheduled this fall.  Our hope is by attending this group you will begin to develop coping skills that will help you work your way through your “natural” grieving process.  Information will be shared to better prepare the group members of what they may expect to happen during their mourning process.

 

The group will be led by Angie Robertson, MSCC.   She has worked as a bereavement educator for thirteen years.  She is currently employed by Compassionate Care Hospice in Wilmington, Delaware.  Angie also works with elementary school students in Cecil County sponsored by the Northern Chesapeake Foundation and leads Senior Grief Workshops for Wilmington University.  

 

The support group is scheduled for seven consecutive Monday evenings beginning October 18 thru November 29, from 6-8 PM.  The group will be held at the Cecil County Library in Elkton, Maryland, located at 301 Newark Avenue.  A Newark Support Group will be held six consecutive Wednesdays beginning, October 13 thru November 17 at 6-8 pm at the United Methodist Church, located at 69 E. Main Street, Newark, DE. There is no fee for this support group, but pre-registration is requested. Please call (410) 398-3389 to reserve a seat. 

 

Please share the enclosed information with family members and friends.

 

We welcome this opportunity to help support you and your family in your healing process following the death of your loved one.

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Non Traditional Funerals

by Frank Wed, September 22 2010 00:13

            Have you ever thought about what you would like to happen at your funeral? How would you like the story of your life to be told? More and more people are opting for something more than the traditional funeral. This seems especially true of the baby boom generation which always seems to embrace the unique and non traditional.

            Some non traditional ways of personalizing funerals and celebrating a life include

  • Displaying arts, crafts, poetry or other personal artifacts that belonged to the deceased during the wake or service.
  • Leading the funeral procession past some of the deceased's favorite spots.
  • Holding the funeral in a favorite spot of the deceased, especially if he or she was not a churchgoer. A woodland or park might be more appropriate for the nature lover. Some other ideas might include an arena or a beach.
  • Playing favorite songs of the deceased's at the wake or during a memorial service.
  • Releasing balloons, doves or butterflies at the interment, as a celebration of the life and spirit of the deceased.
  • Using a personalized photo display
  • Using technology for options like video tributes and online condolences/social networking.
  • Family and friends writing letters containing their unspoken thoughts (personal, negative or positive), that are then placed in the casket with the deceased.

            One of the advantages of the Life Celebration Home® concept is the freedom to think “outside the box”. We are the experts in helping families co-create a meaningful tribute of the loved one from the most traditional to a non-traditional service. Our directors at R.T. Foard Funeral Home do much more than gather information and sell caskets. We pride ourselves on the highest quality service with the talents and resources to share the story of a loved one’s life,  capturing the lifestyle, personality, interests and relationships of a lifetime.

What is a Life Celebration Home?

by Frank Thu, September 16 2010 19:50

           If you have had the occasion to call us recently, you may have noticed the person who answers the phone uses the phrase “Life Celebration® Home” rather that funeral home.  This is not just a change in terms; it is our way of telling you we are about so much more than arranging funerals.

 

            In May of 2010, every member of the R.T. Foard Funeral Home staff, full and part time, went through intensive training to better serve our families and work with our families to co-create an experience to honor and celebrate a life well lived.

            The Life Celebration® process actually begins with the call to the funeral home at the time of the death. The funeral director, in addition to gathering and giving information, tries to listen and help the family to begin thinking about the loved one – how his or her life story is unique and deserves to be celebrated. Collecting photographs, telling stories and sharing are huge steps toward healing.

 

            The life celebration continues through the process of the transfer of the deceased into the care of the funeral home, if that takes place at the home. Again, the persons who come to the home are a very important part of this entire process.

 

            For families, the Life Celebration Experience represents a final opportunity to co-create a profound and inherently personal tribute to their loved one, forging lasting memories that will remain long after the funeral. By celebrating a life in this way, families strengthen their traditions, renew their ties, and create a shared experience that begins the long healing process. 

 

            When the family meets with the funeral director to discuss arrangements is where the co-creation of the experience takes shape. The family brings with them 25 photos to tell a life story. Through those photos and sharing with the funeral director, all present come to know the lifestyle, talents, interests, passions, relationships, hobbies etc etc that made this person unique. It is from this co-creation that the Life Celebration® is born.

 

            Following the arrangement co-creation, the funeral director works to create a service that is as unique and personal as the individual who is gone. We have seen what a difference it has made since May and when you have the occasion to experience a Life Celebration®, you won’t forget it.

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Helping a Someone During a Time of Loss

by Frank Sun, January 24 2010 09:00

“IF THERE’S ANYTHING I CAN DO….”

 

“We all felt so lost when Dad passed away,” remembers Barbara C— an accountant from Ohio.  “So many people asked if they could help, but nobody really knew what to do for us.”

 

When sorrow strikes a family member or friend, our first – and most proper – impulse is to offer our help and support.  Generally, we say something like “If there’s anything I can do to help, please call.”  And then we leave, and the family seldom calls.

 

But there is a way you can be of real value to a family who is coping with the loss of a loved one.  Instead of asking what you can do, suggest some of the things you’re prepared to do, and then do them.

 

For example, at a time of loss, families and friends gather.  Some come from out of town, traveling long distances.  So if you think through everything a gathering of people generally will require, you can recommend to the family the specific responsibilities you can accept.

 

People who come together in a group need many things.  Hotel reservations.  Transportation from the airport.  Food.  Directions.  You can certainly think of others.  So, when you say to a bereaved friend “Let me prepare a dinner for your out of town guests,” or “Tell me who needs to be picked up at the airport, and I’ll take care of it,” you are helping them remember all that needs to be done, and taking the burden from them at the same time.

 

After the funeral, there are other tasks to perform.  Here again, it is possible to do much for a bereaved family if you offer to take on specific responsibilities.  Family and friends might still need transportation arrangements, restaurant recommendations, or other kinds of attention.  And while many of the legal details, such as insurance and pension claims, must be completed by the family, you may be able to provide other types of help such as babysitting, grocery shopping, or running other errands.

 

The whole idea is this:  if you want to help when a death occurs, offer to do something specific.  Families who are facing a loss do not have the emotional capacity to think of or attend to the many small details that come up before, during, and after a funeral.

 

But that’s what friends are for.

 

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